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Saint John the Theologian

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Wednesday, August 13, 2008

The Logos

Thanks to JB, I was able to put this on here.


In Nestle's Greek text (27 th edition), John 1:1 appears as follows:

εν αρχη ην ο λογος και ο λογος ην προς τον θεον και θεος ην ο λογος. ουτος ην εν αρχη προς τον θεον

A proper translation of the passage is as follows:

1 1 2 In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.

2 He was in the beginning with God.

It can also be translated like this:

1. "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was Divine.

2. He was in the beginning with God.

1 [1-18] The prologue states the main themes of the gospel: life, light, truth, the world, testimony, and the preexistence of Jesus Christ, the incarnate Logos, who reveals God the Father. In origin, it was probably an early Christian hymn. Its closest parallel is in other christological hymns, Col 1:15-20 and Philippians 2:6-11. Its core (John 1:1-5, 10-11, 14) is poetic in structure, with short phrases linked by "staircase parallelism," in which the last word of one phrase becomes the first word of the next. Prose inserts (at least John 1:6-8, 15) deal with John the Baptist.
2 [1] In the beginning: also the first words of the Old Testament (Genesis 1:1). Was: this verb is used three times with different meanings in this verse: existence, relationship, and predication. The Word (Greek logos): this term combines God's dynamic word (Genesis), personified preexistent Wisdom as the instrument of God's activity (Proverbs), and the ultimate intelligibility of reality (Hellenistic philosophy). With God: the Greek preposition here connotes communication with another.

In Aramaic it is as follows:

1ܒ݁ܪܺܫܺܝܬ݂ ܐܺܝܬ݂ܰܘܗ݈ܝ ܗ݈ܘܳܐ ܡܶܠܬ݂ܳܐ ܘܗܽܘ ܡܶܠܬ݂ܳܐ ܐܺܝܬ݂ܰܘܗ݈ܝ ܗ݈ܘܳܐ ܠܘܳܬ݂ ܐܰܠܳܗܳܐ ܘܰܐܠܳܗܳܐ ܐܺܝܬ݂ܰܘܗ݈ܝ ܗ݈ܘܳܐ ܗܽܘ ܡܶܠܬ݂ܳܐ ܂
2ܗܳܢܳܐ ܐܺܝܬ݂ܰܘܗ݈ܝ ܗ݈ܘܳܐ ܒ݁ܪܺܫܺܝܬ݂ ܠܘܳܬ݂ ܐܰܠܳܗܳܐ܂

or As seen here

In Aramaic, the “Word” is translated as “miltha- ” In Syriac-Aramaic, Jesus’ language, “miltha” is the word which translated into Greek became Logos. Miltha means "mind energy," the essence of Mind.


Also in Greek, the word "Logos" also means "Plan", "Reason", "Logic", but in English, we mostly translate it as "Word". But the Ancients understood it as being much more than just "Word".






JB & JNORM888

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